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Team Kelbly Tactical


Meet the members of Team Kelbly Tactical!

Christopher Tressler

Christopher Tressler

Bio

Shooting and hunting have been part of my life since I was strong enough to lift a rifle. I have been fortunate to grow up spending a fair amount of time in the outdoors, mostly hunting and fishing in the western United States. I shot my first long range precision rifle match in the fall of 2011 and the sport has consumed most of my free time since. Through practice and regular participation in local and national level matches I am increasing my skill and level of competitiveness.

I am the director of match operations at the Big Sandy range near Wikieup, AZ, where we hold a long range match nearly every month, with occasional night and extreme long range (>1700 yards) matches. I am a member of the Phoenix, AZ based Long Range Precision Rife Shooters club (LRPRS), which holds monthly matches as well. I have been a member of the Precision Rifle Series since its inception. I am active in the promotion of the shooting sport and hunting, and I enjoy teaching safe handling and shooting skills through “new shooter” clinics.

Select Match History

  • 11th place - Precision Rifle Shooters of Idaho Shootout, Aug. 2016
  • 15th place - Rifles Only Bash, Oct. 2015
  • 7th place - Vegas Precision Rifle Challenge, June 2015
  • 12th place - Surefire Match Hosted by Michael Voigt, Sept. 2014
  • 14th Place - New Mexico Precision Rifleman’s Championship, Apr. 2014
  • 7th place - Vegas Precision Rifle Challenge, Nov. 2013
  • 10th place - Surefire Match Hosted by Michael Voigt, Nov. 2013

Dorgan Trostel

Dorgan Trostel

Bio

I was born in Brighton, CO in 1984. I am married and have a 5 yr old boy and a 2 yr old boy and most fortunate to have a beautiful wife who allows me to compete nationally. I have been hunting and shooting since I was big enough to hold a rifle. Having 5 brothers and 4 sisters, my family was dependent on game meat as our main source of sustenance throughout the year. This put the burden of being an excellent shot to make ethical kills on all game we hunted. Not only that, there is/was serious competition in the family for the title of best shot. My family and I still have regular competitions, both rifle and shotgun, for bragging rights.

The only nickname I’ve gotten from shooting is Danger. A range officer misread my name as Danger and it has stuck. I had the match director come up to me afterwards and ask why I was being a “danger” so it was mildly embarrassing. All in good fun though.

To support my hobby I am work for the family construction business designing and installing fire sprinkler systems.

As a 13 year old, I participated in the Whittington Adventure Camp in Raton, NM. Out of more than sixty kids aged from 13-17 over a 2-week shooting/camping adventure, I was awarded Top Rifle Shot. I later returned to this camp and was an instructor for two years. After that, there was a gap in my competitive shooting while I went to high school, and later as I went to college. At Colorado School of Mines in Golden, CO, I was Vice President of the Shooting Club. After graduation from CSM, I began Benchrest Shooting in 2009 and after a year of realizing these “old guys” were kicking my butt on a regular basis( I got a few licks in and met some great people) I needed something with a more physical aspect to it. In 2010 I made the switch to tactical style competitions and have not looked back. My first rifle was a GAP smithed Defiance action 308 with a 5-25 US Optics scope in True MOA. At my first match I was dialing my wind and could not for the life of me figure out why I was getting further and further away from the target. After the string of fire I asked and was soon schooled that I was dialing the wind the wrong direction. HA!! SO if you haven’t shot a match before, don’t be afraid of making any mistakes. We all did and still do.

As mentioned above I got into shooting competitively a few years before there were any governing bodies in the sport. Locally, there was one match and of course the Raton, NM one day match. I met my friend RJ there and have seen the sport grow from maybe 5 guys to last weekend there were over 30 competitors at a club match. In 2010, 30 people was a large match. Now there are nearly 50 matches a year with 100+ competitors. Amazing.

This coming up 2017 Season I have a few goals. First and foremost is to have fun as always. It is important to me at least to remember it’s a game and to not take it too seriously. I see too many shooters get caught up in worry about the prize table or National rankings and forget the true meaning of the sport. This was started by great people that enjoy being marksmen. Friendly rivalries have evolved but it is about the people and shooting to the best of your abilities.

Ian Kelbly

Ian Kelbly

Bio

I began shooting Benchrest at 13 years old and competed in a few local matches. I really began competing at 17 years old in FTR with one of our Grizzly Rifles with a 13” twist barrel shooting 155 Grain Sierra Palma bullets. I took 15th in the country in 2008 in the FTR class. From FTR class I moved up to F-Open to begin testing our 6.5x55 GWI cartridge with a 140 Grain Berger VLD Target. With that rifle I was able to place in the top 50 in the country while testing loads to prove its efficiency.

I competed in F-Open class for 3 years and became uninterested in chasing the 7mm bullets, bullet pointing, and magnum calibers that were driving the highest scores. In 2013 I went to the PRS Finale at K&M Shooting Complex in Florida. I was instantly hooked by the high pace precision long range bolt action competitions. In 2014 we formed Team Kelbly Tactical and added Christopher Tressler, and Marcus Blanchard as shooters for us. In 2015 I began competing in the PRS series and shot The Lone Star Challenge, and the SilencerCo Quiet Riot.

2015 was a tough year as I continually got beat at every match, driving my rifle skills to be better every match, while testing new features in our rifles and in our actions. We released the Atlas Tactical action in 2015, giving shooters the ultimate action for slick and quick bolt cycling and the advantage of a mechanical ejector. We have constantly improved our products every year as we have seen better ways to make our products (Extreme Duty Bolt Stop, Tilted TG Ejector, Kelbly’s Barricade Stop, 12” Fore-End Picatinny rails).

In 2016 Marcus Blanchard left the team and we added Dorgan Trostel. In 2016 I shot the Kelbly’s VPRC, Defiance LRSE, Woody’s PRS Match, and the GAP Grind (The GAP Grind was my brother Ryan’s first Tactical Match).

In 2017 we have added Keith Baker as a shooter. We are also releasing our new Black Bear Tactical action which is a fully integral square action designed to give the best Tactical abilities in an action while maintaining the highest accuracy required for precision rifles. 2017 is also the inaugural year for the NRL (National Rifle League) which was started by Travis Ishida, Tyler Frehner, and myself. The NRL is designed to drive the best competitions and limit the number of “national” level matches, making it easier for competitors to plan their yearly shoots, so that we aren’t going to 10+ matches a year to get into a championship. 2017 I will compete in the NRL only, Dog Valley Precision Challenge, The JC Steel Challenge, and The High Country Precision’s Mile-High Shootout.

I love competing and seeing all of my friends that I have made over the years. What really drives me is to be a better shooter at every match, I don’t mind being a middle of the pack shooter as long as I am continually evolving and getting better! We use these matches to test new products, new ideas, and to constantly drive Kelbly’s to make the best products in the world.

Ryan Kelbly

Ryan Kelbly

Bio

I shot my first ever short range benchrest match when I was 14 years old, I had my Grandfather George Kelbly Sr. as my coach for the first match, here at our Super Shoot. I can still remember one of the greatest quotes my Grandfather told me at this match, I had asked him what should I do with that wind condition out there? He’s response was “ pull the F*****G trigger and you’ll find out what the wind is doing” I will never forget that, really taught me to figure out the wind reading on my own.

I continued to shoot short range benchrest till I was 16, I had a blast learning how to read wind and wind flags, I think it gave me a good life lesson on the wind reading. I wasn’t a top shooter or even close to competiting with the top shooters but still to this day I’m out there shooting for the fun and love of the sport. After short range game I switched over to shoot FTR with my Brothers old FTR rig he used which was a Kelbly Grizzly II pillar bedded into our HCIT stock, running 155 Bergers out of a 28” Brux Barrel. I shot a lot of local matches and eventually made my way down to Raton, NM to shoot at the Nationals. I finished in the later top half and was very satisfied with that, again I would love to win but that’s not my focus.

I focus on learning and just being a good sport about everything, I would rather help a shooter than to beat them. I finished shootng FTR at about 19 years old and then just stop shooting for a couple years besides testing rifles and just going out a plinking at our range here. When I got hooked on the Tactical style shooting was when I went to work my first year at shot show when I was 21 and got to watch the PRS finale at the Sin City Precision held match in Vegas. I think what really attracted me to this style of shooting was the degree of challenging mind and body stages, but more than that the people who were shooting in this discipline. Every shooter I know has gone above and beyond to help everyone out in their squad or who’s around them that day, and that continues to be seen. So I finally bit the bullet in October of 2016 and went down to the Gap Grind and shot as my Brother’s amateur. I ended up 44th overall out of 123 am’s, which I didn’t think was bad seems how that was my first time ever shooting steel.

I am so honored to work here at Kelbly’s and for them to have me on their team and let me go out there and test and use our products I am more than grateful for the opportunities they give me. I may not be the best shot out there but when I pull that trigger it leaves a smile on my face that a bad stage can not wipe off. I look forward to shooting in this sport until I can’t pull a trigger anymore, and I look forward to representing Kelbly’s in the best way I can because we truly care for the shooting industry and strive on the quality of our product and team members.

Pull the trigger, sling some lead, smile, and kick ass!!


Keith Baker

Keith Baker

Bio

I own a heating & air conditioning company, and my wife and I have four kids (18, 16, 13 and 11). My family is the most important thing in the world to me, but with the stress of being a small business owner it’s important for me to be able to get away and relax. Competitive sports are my favorite way to do so, and I’m fortunate that my family both supports and encourages me.

I grew up with outdoor sports being a central part of my life, and they have always been something I have loved. I was taught how to properly use a gun before I was taught my ABC’s. Over the years I’ve competed in countless fishing tournaments and shooting sports, but there is nothing I love better than just being outdoors hunting or fishing or hiking with my family and my friends. One of my favorite times of the year is the youth hunt season – I enjoy teaching kids how to use a firearm and a bow, as well as the art of ethical hunting and appreciation of the outdoors. Aside from hunting together, the whole family enjoys fishing on Lake Erie, and we try to do it as often as we can.

One of my favorite things about competitive shooting is the rapport between the competitors. It seems like everyone wants to help each other and learn, as much as they want to win. The competition is fierce but it is also friendly, and there is nothing better than seeing your friends do well and being able to learn from experts in all areas. Even though I have just recently begun competing on a national level, I am already very impressed with how much everyone enjoys the experience, even when they’re taking the competition very seriously. I feel like I learn so much every time, and since I’m an adrenaline junkie it’s the perfect way to get my “fix.” I enjoy the science behind it, the preparation, and the pure excitement of competing – and then I love the constant refinement of technique that I can employ to try to improve myself. I feel like it’s something that will always be challenging no matter how long I’ve been doing it, especially with learning how to maintain mental focus under extreme stressors. And the fact that there are aspects of it that I can’t control, like the weather, makes it even more humbling. When I shoot a match and do well I feel like I have really accomplished something.

I’m very proud to be a part of Team Kelbly.

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